Moving for Mental Health 2019

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What a beautiful day! This year we had gorgeous weather for Moving for Mental Health. With the great weather came a great crowd. Nearly 300 people joined us for what was our biggest crowd yet! Together we raised over $15,000 to support the Chrysalis mission to promote mental health recovery in our community by supporting work opportunities that encourage hope healing, and wellness.  Here are what some event attendees had to say.

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“The Chrysalis Moving for Mental Health was an extremely well organized event. The beautiful course, friendly volunteers, and post-race entertainment exceeded expectations. I will certainly attend this exciting 5K next year to support awareness for mental health.” – Race Participant

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“As a new Chrysalis employee, this was my first Moving for Mental Health. It was a pleasure being a part of this vital connection to the community.  The turnout was spectacular and the participation by my coworkers was fantastic.  I have been part of other organizations in the Milwaukee and Madison areas that put on events to foster the movement of mental health, but Chrysalis has them beat by miles. The professionalism and attention to detail were far greater than anything I’ve been a part of and shows how much Chrysalis is involved in the community.  In short Chrysalis not only “talks the talk but we walk the walk.” – Furman Avery, Chrysalis Employment Specialist

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“Moving for Mental Health is a worthwhile event that raises a lot of money for Chrysalis to be able to offer its services. I liked mingling with others and seeing people that I wouldn’t necessarily see otherwise. I think the event is well run, and a successful fundraiser each year!” – Chrysalis Client

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We’re already looking forward to Moving for Mental Health 2020! Hope to see you there!

Pets Influence on Mental Health

by Linda Hansen & Alysha Clark

May is Mental Health month.  What would we do without our animal friends, of all kinds, to support us and bring joy back to our lives during and after recovery?Animals can be a very important part of maintaining a person’s mental health.  As pets, they know how their person is feeling at all times. As therapy animals, they can enrich our lives by being an additional means of support.

Pets and therapy animals can help someone just by their presence alone.  The care that is also required for their health and deposition is also beneficial for the person caring for them.

Some great examples of pets contributing to good mental health are found right here at Chrysalis. Lily, George, and Patches are wonderful examples.  

Dani’s dog Lily is often in the offices and spaces of Chrysalis. She greets and welcomes all who come through it’s doors. Her presence is very friendly.

Jess’s dog George is a bundle of energy and is cute and cuddly when is at Chrysalis.

Scooter’s cat Patches has really helped her mentally also.

An example of therapy animals is at “Three Gaits, Inc.”  Therapeutic Horsemanship Center. Their mission is to provide equine-assisted activities and therapies that enhance the live of people with physical, Emotional, or Intellectual challenges.” For more information about Three Gaits Inc, email threegaitsinc@gmail.com.

We interviewed Chrysalis staff member Jean, for a more in depth perspective on how having a pet has changed her life. Jean has been with Chrysalis since 2016 and has a passion for animals.  She has a Cockatiel that will be 21 years old July 4th. Jean moved into an apartment in 1998 that had a no dog rule and her sister suggested that she get a bird. Jean found Milwill at Noah’s Ark and it didn’t take very long for Milwil and Jean to bond. Whenever Jean is down or not feeling well, Milwill sings in her ear, “it’s like he knows” she says.  He is a “ray of Sunshine” and looks like one too. Jean says it’s like talking to a person and the more she sings and talks with him, the less likely he is to get into a depression and neither will she.

Jean recognizes that you have to be committed to getting an animal as it is a lot of responsibility, no matter how small the animal. But it’s worth it, Jean says, then you have something to look forward to when you come home from work, because “You are the center of their universe.”

Recovering from Alcohol

by Linda Hansen

Hi. My name is Linda Hansen and I am sharing a piece I wrote about my recovery from alcohol. April is Alcohol Awareness Month. I know many people struggle with alcohol addiction. No one knows how difficult it is to have this problem more than the person experiencing it.

I had tried quite a few times to quit drinking on my own with no success. I was able to finally stop with help from those in the mental health field.
Thank you Chrysalis for letting me tell my story and possibly helping someone with their recovery.

According to Talbott Recovery, five tips for staying sober is to keep yourself busy, take better care of yourself, take it one day at a time, relax, and turn to positive influences (2019). Alcohol continues to be one of the nation’s most preventable causes of death, second only to tobacco and a poor diet. Signs of alcohol abuse are problems at work and school because of drinking, engaging in dangerous activities, blacking out, legal problems, continuing to drink in spite of health problems that are made worse by alcohol, and family and friends are worried about your drinking (Richard, 2019).

Alcohol treatment options are numerous, evidence-based, and effective. Over 23% of admissions to public treatment centers are due to alcohol abuse, the highest percentage of such admissions. There is no one-size-fits-all standard of treatment and many people need a combination of approaches to address underlying causes of their alcoholism (Alcohol.org, 2011).   At least one-third of alcoholics fully recover. Using prescription drugs to combat alcohol dependency, in combination with treatment, boost the recovery success rate to 50% (RenewEveryday.com, 2011).  

At the end of the day, recovery from an alcohol is not just about staying sober. It is about reinventing your life so that you find peace and other benefits of quitting alcohol (Keller, 2018).

References:

Alcohol.org. (2011, December 23). Statistics & Information on Alcoholism & Addiction Treatment Help. Retrieved from https://www.alcohol.org/statistics-information/.

Keller, Amy. (2018, May 24). Alcohol Recovery. Retrieved from https://www.drugrehab.com/addiction/alcohol/recovery/.

RenewEveryday.com (2011). Addiction & Recovery: The Stats. Retrieved from http://www.reneweveryday.com/resources/addiction-recovery-facts/.

Richard, Patti. (2019). 2018 Alcoholism Statistics You Need to Know. Retrieved from https://talbottcampus.com/alcoholism-statistics/.

Talbott Recovery. (2019). 5 Tips for Staying Alcohol-Free During the Winter. Retrieved from https://talbottcampus.com/addiction-and-mental-health- resources/alcoholism-and-drug-abuse-articles/5-tips-for-staying-alcohol-free-during-the-winter/.

2018 – Supported Employment Year in Review

If you ask anyone on the IPS team to define success for this program, you’d probably get a lot of different kinds of answers. Is it the number of clients who found jobs? Is it hearing a story of a client who’s mental health was improved after starting work? What about a client who overcame a really tough situation while maintaining their job? Or maybe it’s making a strong partnership with an employer in our community?

Luckily, we don’t have to pick just one answer! The IPS Team set goals for 2018 and we’re excited to share our success in each of them!

  1. Client Hires – Every year, the IPS team has supported more clients than the year before. This also means that we’ve supported more clients in finding work. In 2016 – 48 clients were hired in new jobs. In 2017 – that number rose to 86! In 2018 – 115 was the number to shoot for! We knew this was going to be a lofty goal, but we were confident that our clients would experience this level of success. The year really started off on the right foot…our first job hire was on January 1st, 2018! And we didn’t slow down from there. The IPS Team supported 130 job hires in total!
  2. Employer Partnerships – One of the IPS model’s principles is “Systematic Job Development” which means that Employment Specialists spend time visiting local employers to learn about their hiring needs. We perform job development based on clients’ preferences and the goal is to build relationships with employers that can help to support our clients in their vocational goals. But the IPS team didn’t want to stop there, we had a goal of sitting down with 6 employers that were interested in building a stronger partnership. We certainly succeeded and built relationships with Culinary Creations, The City of Madison and Exact Sciences to name a few! These businesses have not only hired clients, but have offered to perform mock interviews, sat down with staff to give more in depth information on their HR processes, and have continued to be strong partners to our program. We’re excited to see who we’ll connect with this year!
  3. Another goal of our team was to increase staff self-care. This is a goal that we plan on having every year as we know it’s that important! Some of the ways we practiced this was to prioritize staff check-ins during meetings, dedicate monthly meetings to evaluating the IPS program, getting out of the office for quarterly breakfasts and enjoying staff lunches together. After working out in the community with our clients, it was great to catch up with other staff, and we enjoyed strengthening our Chrysalis Community!

We can’t wait to see what goals we can tackle in 2019. A few other notable awesomes:

  • The IPS team grew by 3! We’re excited to welcome Ashna, Furman and Jenny to the team! Look out for a spotlight on Facebook introducing these new staff.
  • The Supported Employment Demonstration enrolled 39 new clients into the IPS program.
  • The IPS Team was presented with The Exemplary Fidelity Award at the WI IPS Learning Collaborative Annual Meeting. It was great to be recognized for reaching exemplary status in our last Fidelity Review.

Happy 2019!

The Chrysalis Supported Employment Team

Chrysalis 2018 Success Celebration

Chrysalis had their 4th annual Success Celebration on November 30th, 2018. This year’s celebration was held at a new location, the Goodman Community Center. With the new looks, came new ideas.

Each table had a flower vase centerpiece from the For the One Who Finds Me campaign. This campaign revolves around putting flowers throughout the community in places for others to find them and then pass them along to someone else. #fortheonewhofindsme

Along with the new flowers, came new crafts. This year’s successes were honored by participants, staff, and community members writing their successes on pre-dyed Popsicle sticks, with the result of a collaborative art piece on canvas. The new art will be hung in the Chrysalis office.

This year’s celebration was catered for the first time by Working Class Catering and all who attended enjoyed lasagna. Program updates, including Peer Support, Consumer Advisory Committee, Social Butterfly, Change Team, IPS, and Chrysalis Pops were given. Along with the idea of new, also came new awards. Participant Pam was given the first annual Chrysalis Achievement Award and her employer Julia from Culinary Creations through Catholic Multicultural Center was awarded Employer of the Year.

 

This year’s Success Celebration was a HUGE SUCCESS! Thank you to everyone who joined us and participated in sharing the many success Chrysalis has had over the 2018 year.

Last Days in Japan: Tokyo

Our time in Japan is coming to an end. We are here in Tokyo to enjoy the sites and have one last meeting. We had the great privilege to talk with Dr. Ito and his staff at the National Institute of Mental Health of Japan and his staff about the benefits of incorporating peer specialists within mental health programs. I also had the opportunity to talk to different employment specialist and multiple researchers looking at the IPS model. The conversation was great. The staff were all excited about incorporating recovery models into their practice.

The next days we had the opportunity to explore Tokyo a bit more. Below are some photos from a couple of the sites! All in all the trip has been great. I learned a lot and I look forward to bring the information back to Chrysalis and the rest of the mental health community in Madison. Tomorrow back in the air and back to Madison.

 

Visiting with Dr. Ito and his staff.

Visiting with Dr. Ito and his staff.

Sushi from Tushkiji Fish Market.

Sushi from Tushkiji Fish Market.

We had the opportunity to see a Kabuki play, a classical Japanese theatre.

We had the opportunity to see a Kabuki play, a classical Japanese theatre.

Day 4 & 5: Obihiro

Our last days in Obihiro were spent visiting Miyajima Farms, a cooperative community just under an hour outside of Obihiro. The farm was started by a Nozomu Miyajima who got his dairy science degree in Madison and worked in a farm just outside of the city. His farm has award winning cheeses (that we luckily got to sample)! The community is very welcoming to people with disabilities and is seen as a therapeutic setting. You could really feel the healing energy just being there for a few hours. After the visit a few Madison folks and OE hospital staff checked out a local Onsen (Japanese natural hot spring). Later that evening we enjoyed a great goodbye dinner. The next day we left for Tokyo. 

Miyajima Farms. The setting was beautiful!

Miyajima Farms. The setting was beautiful!

 

Brown Swiss milk cows.

Brown Swiss milk cows.

 

So delicious.

So delicious.

 

Our trip the local Onsen.

Our trip the local Onsen.

 

Japanese breakfasts are a piece of art.

Japanese breakfasts are a piece of art.

 

Day 2 & 3: Obihiro

The last two days have been jam packed with site visits. We have meet many interesting people who are doing some really great thing in the city of Obihiro. Everyone is excited to share information about their programs. This morning was particularly interesting. We met with a newly formed Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) team. We talked about the importance of fidelity, evidenced practices and recovery. One of the ACT team staff was very focused on employment and had great information to share. He will be visiting Madison in July and will be coming to Chrysalis at that time. Below are some photos from the last two days.

Dinner is served!

Dinner is served!

Visiting an integrated hospital, nursing home care center.

Visiting an integrated hospital, nursing home care center.

Our view from lunch. Beautiful gardens.

Our view from lunch. Beautiful gardens.

Visiting a new outpatient day center and ACT team through OE hospital.

Visiting a new outpatient day center and ACT team through OE hospital.

IPS is something that the ACT team hopes to incorporate in the future. Work was a regular part of the discussion.

IPS is something that the ACT team hopes to incorporate in the future. Work was a regular part of the discussion.

Sitting in on the ACT team morning meeting.

Sitting in on the ACT team morning meeting.

Morning consumer check-in. We had a really nice discussion about what recovery meant for each person.

Morning consumer check-in. We had a really nice discussion about what recovery meant for each person.

Recovery was a large part of the day center model.

Recovery was a large part of the day center model.

Madison delegation in the news.

Madison delegation in the news.

Madison delegation in the news.

Madison delegation in the news.

Employment program supported by the city government were all over Obihiro.

Employment program supported by the city government were all over Obihiro.

Here the city contracts work to people with disabilities.

Here the city contracts work to people with disabilities.

Day 1: Obihiro

We made it to Obihiro! Since arriving this afternoon it has been a whirl wind of events. We have visited a group home, referral center, agricultural employment site, I gave a presentation on IPS, visited a cookie production employment site, and was interviewed by the local paper. Below are a series of photos from Day 1.

The pod I stayed in at the Haneda airport before catching a flight to Obihiro.

The pod I stayed in at the Haneda airport before catching a flight to Obihiro.

Flying into Obihiro. Looks a lot like Madison. Not pictured are the snow capped mountains in the distance, not so much like Madison.

Flying into Obihiro. Looks a lot like Madison. Not pictured are the snow capped mountains in the distance, not so much like Madison.

Visiting a group home. All consumers are working off-site.

Visiting a group home.

Next door to the group home was a client referral center.

Next door to the group home was a client referral center.

Here consumers work at an agricultural work site.

Here consumers work at an agricultural work site.

My presentation on IPS.

My presentation on IPS.

Visiting the cookie production factory. Very efficient and delicious!

Visiting the cookie production factory. Very efficient and delicious!

Getting interviewed by the local newspapers on my first impressions.

Getting interviewed by the local newspapers on my first impressions of Obihiro.

Tentative Japan Schedule

In just a few short days I will be leaving Madison and be traveling to Obihiro Japan to visit with different mental health treatment providers. Our trip guide, Jo Oyama Miller, just sent out a tentative schedule for our visit. We also have a final list of who will be making this trip.

Ed Erwin – Peer Specialist, Karen Milstein – Peer Specialist at Blacksmith House CSP, Michael Bahl – Blacksmith House CSP Case Manger, Jessica Ecker – Journey Mental Health Center

Tentative Agenda

5/5– Madison delegation arrives in Obihiro. Visit OE Hospital and part of their new ACT team.

5/6 – OE Hospital site visit at their Clinic with Kazu. Welcome party, meet and great with other people from previous trips to Madison.

5/7 – Chrysalis Executive Director, Dani, arrives in Obihiro. Presentation on Individual Supported Employment services to Mr. Sanuki and Mr. Hiwatari.

5/8 – Visit Mr. Hiwatari and his hospital.

5/9–  Spend the day with the new ACT team at the new clinic with Kazu. Visit many different work programs and work sites.

5/10 – OE hospital staff will take group to Miyajima Farms.

5/12- Tokyo, meeting with the National Health Institution at both the outpatient clinic as well as with Dr. Ito. 

But first, Moving for Mental Health this Sunday!